Twilight Sad's fly by night summer stopover

{ }

Jeremy Krinsley | June 19, 2007

<p>From its earliest days in their small hometown outside of Glasgow, The Twilight Sad have eschewed the typical race into the industry's arms and towards public success.  Their album might sit prominently on the shelves of Virgin Megastore nationwide, but it didn't get there by virtue of any relentless touring schedule or dogged attentiveness to the press.  Their a fortuitous basement band and sometimes it seems they'd like to stay down there.  The divide between their recorded work and their live shows remains a bit of a chasm, the former a more delicate and varied affair in the face of the noise-fest that overpowers their live shows. </p>

From its earliest days in their small hometown outside of Glasgow, The Twilight Sad have eschewed the typical race into the industry's arms and towards public success. Their album might sit prominently on the shelves of Virgin Megastore nationwide, but it didn't get there by virtue of any relentless touring schedule or dogged attentiveness to the press. Their a fortuitous basement band and sometimes it seems they'd like to stay down there. The divide between their recorded work and their live shows remains a bit of a chasm, the former a more delicate and varied affair in the face of the noise-fest that overpowers their live shows.

From its earliest days in their small hometown outside of Glasgow, The Twilight Sad have eschewed the typical race into the industry's arms and towards public success. Their album might sit prominently on the shelves of Virgin Megastore nationwide, but it didn't get there by virtue of any relentless touring schedule or dogged attentiveness to the press. Their a fortuitous basement band and sometimes it seems they'd like to stay down there. The divide between their recorded work and their live shows remains a bit of a chasm, the former a more delicate and varied affair in the face of the noise-fest that overpowers their live shows.

In an Aversion interview, frontman James Graham had this to say of the divide:
“Sometimes if you came to see us live before you actually heard the record or any recordings we made, you'd probably think we were kind of a noisy band. If you had the record and sat down with it, you can totally see it's more (than noise). We like having the contrast between the record and playing live. There's a lot more instruments on the record. There's only four of us in the band, so we have to keep it as simple as possible. I don't know about you, but I don't like going to see a band that sounds just like their album. That's what we try not to do.”

Apparently, the band hasn't changed its tune, with the shortest spate of highly selective North American tours this July and the next album already in the works.

TOUR DATES
JULY
13 MADISON, WISCONSIN TERRACE
14 CHICAGO, IL UNION PARK (PITCHFORK MUSIC FESTIVAL)
17 BALTIMORE, MD SONAR
18 ALLSTON, MA GREAT SCOTT
19 PHILADELPHIA, PA JOHNNY BRENDA'S
20 NEW LONDON, CT THE OASIS
21 NEW YORK, NY CONEY ISLAND (SIREN FESTIVAL)

 
Impose Main

Summer-Goth-Skeleton
Summer Goth Playlist
EDMAIN
Interviewing Elvis Depressedly
marijuana-homer
Gchat with @Homer_Marijuana
Diarrhea Planet // Photo by Shaina Bracamontez
In Defense Of Bad Band Names
Prince Rama
Breaking Up with Alcohol
Allison Crutchfield
Allison Crutchfield: Not All Women