Week in Pop: HDLSS, Jesus Sons, LuxDeluxe

Sjimon Gompers

Through the darkness of futures past—HDLSS's Far & Wolfy emerge from the billows of fog machine smoke; press photo courtesy of HDLSS.

Gold Class

The cool class called Gold Class; photographed by Paige Clark.

Australian quartet Gold Class delivered the electric-floral single “Rose Blind” featured off the upcoming album Drum available August 18 from felte. All of your late-70s post-punk fantasies become rejuvenated with a sense of freshness & newness where 1977 feels as new & cool now in the year of who-knows-what otherwise known as 2017. Songwriter & singer Adam Curley introduced their upcoming album with the following introductory reflections:

The week we started to write Drum, my relationship ended and I was left alone in a draughty old house, which belonged to a friend of a friend. In the house, I sat around with my notebook, the quiet hours cut with news from friends and the TV: the suicides of musicians and writers I’d known and queer kids I hadn’t; the systematic abuse of vulnerable people, the constant mockery of anyone on the outs.

I knew what the purpose of the album would be when I wrote the repeated line in “Get Yours”: “There’s none left here and all I need.” I wanted it to be a record of defiance, a resistance to the idea of scrambling for a place at a table that wasn’t set for you. A sort of a love letter to anyone who not only can’t meet the standard but doesn’t want to. I wanted it to be a record of rage and ecstasy and endless nights and sex and dumb fun and ventures in solidarity. Not just an album of urgency and longing, but one of abandon and a reclaiming of a self beyond boundaries.

But I couldn’t avoid what was immediately happening in my life, either, that the end of my relationship had uncovered a lot of the feelings of isolation I experienced growing up. And so it turned out that the album is also personal, and I think is in conversation with queer histories of silence and evasion and transgression, which I was revisiting through the writing of James Baldwin and Cocteau. Childhood imagery kept creeping into the lyrics. Maybe I was trying to come to some peace with the past and to stand up and find some agency in the present. I suppose it was the most defiant thing I could think to do: not to write as some act of catharsis but in an attempt simply to document and claim my existence; that I am here.

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