The Land Increases, “This Pink Sky”

Sjimon Gompers

The Land Increases's Jeffrey Dalessandro. (courtesy of The Land Increases / No Recordings)

To begin to describe the project The Land Increases from NYC's Jeffrey Dalessandro, I found myself at a loss of immediate descriptors. What we know is that Dalessandro's mixing, mastering and production are conjoined by the writings and recordings from fellow New Yorker じ. KO. Succinct sound collages marry English and Japanese audio languages that appear, disappear then later reappear in the dizzying high BPM drum and ocean cool synths that spills the Atlantic and Pacific seas closer together. Putting it best, The Land Increases's label No Recordings tweeted the following brief, haiku-esque introduction that is a great prologue to today's premiere of “This Pink Sky”:

Every sound vignette is given a visual counterpart where a rapid display of found images from the classical, current, ripped from tabloids, televisions, smart phones, vintage advertisements and Eastern artifacts are fired forth in front of your eyes. The sci-fi futurism instructional is brought to the present day as an anonymous, disembodied voice begins the exercise in synthetic permutations with the introductory notes on process of, “absorption, mutation, preparation”.

“What is the pink sky, why? Why is the sky pink? Anybody have a chance?” The electronic robot voice gets interrupted by Japanese spoken sound bites that in turn cue rhythmic rumblings as voices blared on a megaphone are heard in the distance. The keyboards strike tones in MIDI bass notes whose dimensions are laid out and opened up by sustains. But as Dalessandro told us in today's interview following the debut, the secrets of the sonic, surreal, and found sound amalgamations abide by the cryptic equation of, “Vanity > Recognition > Surprise”. Even then, The Land Increases abides by an algorithmic code that is constantly regenerating and remapping like genomic self-recoding DNA.

We had our people get us contact with Jeffrey's people to further explore the unique abstract approaches to audio adventures and experimentation.

“Absorption, mutation, preparation…you got it”. Where did you find this sound byte? What relevance of absorption, mutation and preparation have for you on on “This Pink Sky”?

Do you want to be candy, cookie or cupcake when Bu is eating you? We are all pink on the inside.

What is the relationship between the robotic vocals and the Eastern discourse samples in “Pink Sky”?

Separated with children.

Are the visual components made before, simultaneous, or after the audio composites?

Everything is always happening.

What is the process of selecting images for making montages to your own expansive style of amalgamated electronics and found sound styles?

Vanity > Recognition > Surprise

How do you go about selecting your audio samples?

First things first, unless last.

What elements and processes go into your approach to sound sequencing?

Empty head.

Your chosen moniker of The Land Increases; is it in any way indicative of your approach to creating new terra-forms from your own experimental audio developments and research?

Man is a melty island.

Jeffrey's project The Land Increases release the debut 7″ June 18 from No Recordings.

Side A:

This Pink Sky (1:16)
Export (0:44)
Melting Man (0:58)
Black or White (1:09)
Doraemon (1:37)
¸¸¸¸¸¸¸¸ (1:10)

Side B:

危険と報酬 (1:13)
Everyman (1:47)
Ca Fe (2:54)
ラジオ(0:58)

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